STEVE LUKATHER
Before tackling this course, you should be comfortable with all the material from Rogue Spammer

Ollie will now take you through 5 of Steve's most awesome licks and techniques to help you apply all of these new ideas to your own improvisation. We look at hybrid picking, alternate picking, economy picking, 'dips' with the whammy bar, harmonising using diatonic 3rds and dorian ideas!

Summary: Hybrid Picking

For our first lick we will be looking at hybrid picking through the D minor pentatonic scale. The sequence on the scale is relatively simple as it is in fours, but using the hybrid picking can be tricky at first. However, once you have learnt this technique, you will find the lick far easier than if you tried to do it with alternate picking. Just to be sure you are visualising the correct scale shape, here is pentatonic shape 1:

Materials: The Tab

Check out the full tab below and use the slow down feature to really make sure you are getting the technique perfect. Have fun!

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Summary: Picking Masterclass

For our second lick we are looking at a combination of alternate picking and economy picking. Alternate picking is where we always do 'down up' strokes with the plectrum. Economy picking is where we break this alternate picking to create more of a sweeping sound, typically as you change string. In terms of the actual lick we are using the key of B major and using the B major scale across the neck.If you are unsure of the scale shapes, check them out below:

Materials: The Tab

Check out the full tab below and use the slow down feature to really make sure you are getting the technique perfect. Have fun!

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Summary: Mixolydian pentatonic

For this lick we are introducing two new ideas. Firstly we introduce a cool new scale which we call the 'Mixolydian Penatonic'. This simply means that we are playing the minor pentatonic with a raised (or major) 3rd instead of the flat 3 we would normally play. This is a really cool scale shape that can be used over any blues or specifically any dominant chord. The two shapes Ollie plays through are shown below:

Summary: Dips!

The dips that Ollie creates using the whammy bar are literally hammering on with your left hand and pushing the whammy bar with your right, which creates a really cool Lukather style effect. To get this sound correct you need your legato playing to be accurate and strong enough to allow you not to use the pick.

Materials: The Tab

Check out the full tab below and use the slow down feature to really make sure you are getting the technique perfect. Have fun!

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Summary: Harmonising in 3rds

Harmonised guitar parts were absolutely massive in the 80's, and Steve Lukather was a true master at creating cool harmonsied parts based on diatonic thirds. What are diatonic thirds we hear you say? Well, 'diatonic' simply means within the scale. So if you are on the root note, a diatonic third up is the 3rd note in the scale. Simple as that! In our example we are in the key of C# minor and use the following scale shape:

Materials: The Tab

Check out the full tab below and use the slow down feature to really make sure you are getting the technique perfect. Have fun!

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Summary: Dorian Lick

For our last lick we are looking at a typically challenging Steve Lukather lick using both the Dorian scale and the chromatic scale. We are playing in the key of E Dorian, and using the scale shape below alongside those cool chromatic vibes. We kick off with the B minor arpeggio, which is simply notes within the E Dorian scale. Remember to use your economy picking with this part of the lick! For then on we are in that E Dorian scale shape before getting to those chromatic sections. Chromatic licks are simply starting in the scale, moving out of the scale by going one fret at a time, and finally resolving to another scale note. To start with, be sure you can visualise the scale shapes:

Materials: The Tab

Check out the full tab below and use the slow down feature to really make sure you are getting the technique perfect. Have fun!

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Ready to move on – remember to check out every lesson in this unit first – then try the next unit...

Party In Ollie's Trousers

Let's take a step away from the lead playing and tackle a typical Steve Lukather style rhythm part. Like a lot of more progressive music of the day, this track modulates between a complex 19/8 time signature to a more standard 4/4.