JIMMY PAGE
Before tackling this course, you should be comfortable with all the material from Rock & Rock

Learning to play like Jimmy Page isn't just about being able to solo! The reason he is so popular as a guitarist is thanks to his amazing ability to pen incredible riffs! Through his career he has written some of the biggest riffs of all time, and in this part of the course we will go through how you can achieve these sounds using just a few simple techniques.

Summary: 'Rock & Rock'

In the above tune we have brought together all of the biggest Jimmy Page style riffs so that we can go through how each sound is played, how they are written and the effect they have on a song. Jimmy Page is as creative as they come , but that doesn't mean that every single riff he writes is totally unique. There are always certain themes, techniques and shapes that he'll come back to time after time. So, listen to the track a few times and then move onto the next lesson.

Summary: Big Chords

The first 4 bars are an awesome example of just how powerful a simple chord can be with a bit of distortion. A classic Jimmy Page sound is to use full major chords with gain, instead of powerchords. This really helped define the Zeppelin sound in the early days. The riff in between the chords once again shows off Page's bluesy background as it is based around the E minor pentatonic shape 3, with an additional chromatic note... even though the chord is major! We see this concept commonly in blues playing. Here is the scale and chord on the fretboard:

Materials: The Tab

As we go further through the song, you'll need to use the tab to nail each part. In this lesson, we are looking at the verse (marker written above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those riffs before moving on.

Summary: Chunky Rhythms

When we hit the chorus section, we really want to attack the chords. The basic chord movement goes between E major, then D major, then finally A major / A powerchord. We also have an F# major chord right at the end of the chorus to throw the song a little off key, before resolving back to E in the next verse.

In terms of the rhythm, the pattern is as shown below. Remember that on the 4th, 5th and 6th arrows you should be muting the strings to create a thicker sound. You move to the D major on the 7th arrow and the A riff on the last two red arrows.

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at the chorus(marker written above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those bars before moving on.

Summary: Octave Riffs

For the next new part of the song, we move to octave riffing! This is a huge part of a lot of Zeppelin riffs and is not actually that hard to pull off. The reason octave riff are so popular in rock is that you can play a cool melody within a scale, but strum it! In this case we use the root, flattened 7th, 6th and 5th note of the E major scale with the low E string ringing out. After playing that twice we use the open strings, in a classic Jimmy Page move, to add new character to the part.

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at the Bridge (marker written above the tab). Use the slow down and looping function of the tab viewer to really help you master those octaves before moving on.

Summary: Lead Breaks

Another big part of the Zeppelin sound is the lead breaks. This is where Jimmy Page takes centre stage and pulls out some of his favourite licks. We have written 4 Jimmy Page style licks here for you to learn. They are all based in E minor and use the pentatonic positions across the neck. Lick 1 in shape 1, lick 2 in shape 2 / 1 in the open position, lick 3 in shape 4 and lick 5 in shape 3. Here they are drawn out on the fretboard:

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at the licks (the positions are marked just above the tab). Once you master them you'll be able to piece the entire tune together! Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to help.

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Ready to move on – remember to check out every lesson in this unit first – then try the next unit...

Adding the Full Scale

We will now bring our attention back to lead by analysing how Jimmy Page expands the pentatonic sounds by adding major and minor notes. We call this the 'full scale' and will talk about it in detail in this section!