DAVID GILMOUR
Before tackling this course, you should be comfortable with all the material from Uncomfortably Sensitive

Welcome to the second part of our David Gilmour course! As we build up to the next solo, we need to cover some new techniques which you may not have used before. Gilmour often uses a combination of scales and arpeggios in his soloing; to understand how you can do the same we first need to learn some three-string arpeggio shapes. As always, take your time and have fun!

Summary: Raking & sweeping

Raking and sweeping are two techniques integral to the Gilmour sound. There is a big difference between the two, but in practice they produce a similar effect.

Raking is targeting a note on one of the higher strings and then literally 'raking' your plectrum across the lower strings to get there. The notes are all muted until you hit the target note.

Sweeping is simply dropping your plectrum through an arpeggio at speed.

In fact, both techniques require an identical movement with your right hand; the difference is in your left - fretting - hand. Sweeping requires you to fret each note as you move the pick, whilst raking requires you to mute each note until you hit the target.

SUMMARY: Three-string major arpeggios

Our arpeggio quest begins by learning the three-string major arpeggios. Major arpeggios are simply the root, 3rd and 5th notes of the major scale. We have three shapes to learn, which look like this:

MATERIALS: Finding the shapes

The easiest way to find these shapes in any key is to understand how they relate to the CAGED chord shapes. Below is an example of this relationship in G, then in D. Use the drop down menu to choose between the two keys.

SUMMARY: Three-string minor arpeggios

We will now look at three-string minor arpeggios. Minor arpeggios are simply the root, b3rd and 5th of the major scale. We can therefore take our major shapes, flatten the 3rd and we immediately have three minor shapes. The shapes look like this:

MATERIALS: Finding the shapes

The easiest way to find these shapes in any key is to understand how they relate to the CAGED chord shapes. Below is an example of this relationship in G minor, then in D minor. Use the drop down menu to choose between the two keys.

TUTORIAL: Arpeggio madness!

The video above introduces our topic for next two lessons. This is an exercise to get us playing these arpeggios, which we will soon put in a Gilmour style!

SUMMARY: Arpeggio madness!

In order to get these shapes learnt and understood, we will learn this cool arpeggio tune! This is a challenging part as you are rapidly changing between all the shapes as the chords change. Let's start to break it down by looking at the first half of the piece. The chords are:

Dm /// Bb /// Am /// C /// Dm /// Bb /// Am /// C ///

We could play these arpeggios in any of the positions we have learnt so far, but in this case we have chosen specific shapes for you to play. The arpeggio positions for the first half of the track are as follows:

Materials: The Tab

Below, you will find the full tab for the exercise. Be sure to just practice the first half of the exercise (as shown in the chord chart above). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to help you perfect the sweep picking.

SUMMARY: arpeggio Madness Part 2

Now, let's check out the second half of the exercise. The good news is that the chord chart for the second part is almost exactly the same. The only change is that we hang on a Dm at the end:

Dm /// Bb /// Am /// C /// Dm /// Bb /// Am /// C /// Dm /// ////

However, we are now using different arpeggio shapes further up the neck. We also use all three shapes of D minor in the final two bars, which then connect into pentatonic shape 3. The arpeggio shapes are all as shown here:

Materials: The Tab

Below, you will find the full tab for the exercise. Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to help you perfect the sweep picking.

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full exercise are here to play along with. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it will be up to you to make it sound awesome!

Ready to move on – remember to check out every lesson in this unit first – then try the next unit...

The Layering Effect

If you want to improvise like David Gilmour, you need "The Layering Effect" in your toolbox! You'll learn how this technique can enrich your improvisation, allowing you to easily play pentatonics, full scales, chords and arpeggios in just one position!