DAVID GILMOUR
Before tackling this course, you should be comfortable with all the material from The Layering Effect

We are now ready to tackle our second Gilmour-style solo, inspired by "Another Brick In The Wall", and it's a tricky one! The really cool thing is that we'll be applying all of the new theory we have been working on. The sound is a lot cleaner than "Uncomfortably Sensitive", so we need to be accurate with our technique and draw the tone from our fingers! As always, take your time and have fun!

Summary: "Another Plank In The Fence"

In this period of Gilmour's career, the playing and feel for the guitar combined to make one of the greatest guitar sounds in history! We have now covered most of Gilmour's technique and theory, so now it's all about putting it to the test. Please watch the full video through and then move onto the next lesson, where we'll start to break it down.

LICKS 1-3: GILMOUR BENDS & SCALES

Let's go over the first three licks in the tab, which highlight how Gilmour approaches bends. To begin with, we'll put ourselves in the correct key: D minor. For the opening three licks, we will use the D Minor pentatonic shape 1, as shown below.

Materials: The Tab

As we go further through the solo, you'll need to use the tab to nail each lick. In this lesson, we are looking at licks 1, 2 and 3 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

LICKs 4-5: Minor scale and rhythm hits

As we progress to licks 4 and 5, we start adding in some minor scale notes. Remember the layering effect and how we can simply add the full scale shape on top of the pentatonic shape 1. This gives us the following shapes for these two licks:

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at licks 4 and 5 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

Licks 6-7: Arpeggios

During licks 6 and 7, we start to see arpeggio shapes being used. In this example, we are using arpeggios to mark a chord change in the backing track. This is a nice way to break out of the general D minor noodlings, and create a slightly more ordered sound. The arpeggio we are using is a C major, as the chord is C major. Notice how we also return to the D minor pentatonic / full scale after each arpeggio lick. We are therefore combining the scales and arpeggios to achieve the effect:

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at licks 6 and 7 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Use the slow down and looping function of the tab viewer to really help you master those licks before moving on.

Lick 8-10: Rhythm & Scales

The final three licks return to the D minor scales and pentatonics, but also move around the neck a little more. We start lick 8 in pentatonic shape 1, then move downwards to shape 4 (pentatonic and full scale), before returning to shape 1. The scales look like this:

Materials: The Tab

In this lesson, we are looking at licks 8, 9 and 10 (their positions are marked just above the tab). Once you master them you'll be able to piece the entire solo together! Use the slow down and looping functions of the tab viewer to help.

Audio: Backing Track & Audio

When you are ready, the backing track and full solo are here to play along to. It is worth trying to play with just the backing track, as you will not be 'hiding' behind the recorded guitar part; it's all up to you to make it sound awesome!

Ready to move on – remember to check out every lesson in this unit first – then try the next unit...

Getting The Tone

With David Gilmour it's so important to match the right guitar with the right amp, and then add a few choice pedals to really bring the sound together. In these videos, Chris will show you how we got that classic Gilmour tone!